The ProShow Blog

Tips, tutorials & inspiration for making slideshows

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time-lapse

Stunning Time-lapse of the Aurora Borealis

Photographer William Chua recently led a workshop in Norway, Tromso. He captured these stunning scenes of the northern lights and compiled a time-lapse video using ProShow slideshow software. We love his choice of music and how it’s timed perfectly with the flow of his video.

William is an international, award-winning photographer based in Singapore. He does predominantly weddings, travel, landscapes, and wildlife photography. He has garnered awards from WPPI ( Las Vegas), IPA (New York), MPA (London), PX3 (Paris), PDN, and the Black and White Spider Awards. His works have been published in various publications (including Asian Geographic, Geographical Magazine (UK) , PDN Magazine, Lux Magazine etc). Having led photography workshops to Norway, Bhutan and Africa, and given numerous talks on photography, he hopes to be able to help photo enthusiasts take their photography to the next level.

His works are currently being represented by Modern Art Etc , based in Los Angeles, California

www.williamchua.com/blog
www.facebook.com/williamchuaphotography

 

Beautiful Milky Way Timelapse Video


video by the Pentaxguyz.

We ran across this awesome time-lapse video of the Milky Way that’s composed of over 7 hours of shooting. Images were captured with a Pentax K5 & Samyang 8mm lens. To create the time lapse, all images were brought into Adobe After Effects for video processing and then transferred to Proshow Producer for music and editing purposes.

See more awesome time-lapse videos on our Time-lapse Pinterest board here >

 

Create a Time-Lapse Video in ProShow

Create a time-lapse video in ProShow

Happy Earth Day! Today we were inspired by this time-lapse video that features footage gathered from the astronauts aboard the International Space Station. It shows just how remarkable our planet is!

Time-lapse videos are captivating, inspiring and can portray the world in new and interesting ways. If you’ve ever wanted to try this technique yourself, here are some simple steps for creating a time-lapse video with ProShow.

The basic premise behind a time-lapse video is simple:

  1. Keep your camera still, make sure your focus is set to manual and invest in a timer or device that will automatically capture images for you at a certain pace.
  2. Capture a sequence of images over time, at least once per second will be sufficient for creating the time-lapse look.
  3. Gather your images and bring them into a ProShow (in order). Set your slide times to 0 seconds and your transition times to .05 seconds. Then hit play and preview your video!
  4. ProShow will playback your photos in order at the rate at which you set the slide times. For a quicker playback, shorten your transition times. For a slower playback, lengthen your transition times.
  5. Output your finished slideshow as a video file to use in a larger project or simply upload it to YouTube, Facebook or Vimeo for sharing online.

Use short cut transitions and 0 second slide times.

For detailed time lapse creation instructions, hop over to the Vimeo site. They have some great video tutorials that show you how to get started.

Watch Time-Lapse Videos

Check out our time-lapse board on Pinterest for a collection of awesome examples of time lapse videos – many of them made in ProShow!

 

Cool Stop-Motion Animated Wedding Video

Check out this awesome video by the photography team at Sakhi Photography Studios based in Melbourne, Australia! They put together a truly unique stop-motion animation video in ProShow that you have to see to believe! Read below to see how they did it.

We’ve been using ProShow for a while now to create slideshows for our clients, and we are fairly familiar with its capabilities. The video we created above was made for our friends Ben and Christina. It was shown at their wedding.

One of the biggest advantages ProShow offered when it came to this project was its ability to recognize Photoshop files (PSD files). While creating this video, we were able to keep files in layers, and modify them anytime, and they would automatically get updated in the project.

To create the first sequence of stop motion animation (2:50), we asked the couple to move slowly towards each other. We had the camera set on a tripod, and we snapped around 80 shots as they went through the movements. The actual animation was done the old fashion way; every frame was prepared individually.

When we put it into ProShow, every frame was given 0.01 of a second. This is slower than a usual movie, but that added to the overall feel.

Having the ability to add a second layer to a slide, and that being a Photoshop file with a transparent background, made the sequence showing the different points of interest around the world possible. A great feature and one of the many reasons we love ProShow!

Hope you enjoy the final video. It was a huge hit at the wedding!

Sakhi Photography Studio

 

How to Create a Time-Lapse Video

Time-lapse videos are captivating, inspiring and are popping up in more and more places around the web. If you’ve ever wanted to try this technique yourself, here are some simple steps to get you on your way to creating your own time-lapse videos with ProShow.


Time-lapse video of Mt. Hood reflected in Trillium Lake, Oregon.

We’ve previously shown you how photographer Mark Ridout created a wedding ceremony time-lapse video using ProShow Producer at a recent wedding shot in Canada.

But, calculating the number of shots you need to create your own time lapse can be tricky. Here’s a great article by the guys at 3exposure on how to calculate and plan for your time-lapse shoot.

Once you’ve got all the timing worked out, head over to Vimeo to watch some inspiring examples of time lapse videos and get step-by-step instructions on how to create your own.

The basic premise behind a time-lapse video is simple:

1. Keep your camera still, make sure your focus is set to manual and invest in a timer or device that will automatically capture images for you at a certain pace.

2. Capture a sequence of images over time, at least once per second will be sufficient for creating the time-lapse look.

3. Gather your images and bring them into a ProShow (in order). Set your slide times to 0 seconds and your transition times to .05 seconds. Then hit play and preview your video!

4. ProShow will playback your photos in order at the rate at which you set the slide times. For a quicker playback, shorten your transition times. For a slower playback, lengthen your transition times.

5. Output your finished slideshow as a video file to use in a larger project or simply upload it to YouTube, Facebook or Vimeo for sharing online.

 

Create a Wedding Time Lapse Slideshow

Wedding and portrait photographer Mark Ridout created this awesome time lapse video (time lapse at 1:25) using a $30 dollar timer off eBay, a bunch of still images from the wedding ceremony and ProShow Producer. Here’s how he did it.

“I used a Canon 30D camera to shoot the time lapse segment. I placed the camera on a tripod in the balcony of the church, then pre-focused to the front of the church and turned off the auto focus. (This is done so that you don’t get slight image movement if the lens decides to focus on a moving person.)

Shoot in jpeg mode and use a setting that is slightly larger than 1920 pixels on the longest dimension. For most cameras, that would be the medium quality setting. For the Canon 30D the medium setting is 2544×1696. This file size allows me to create a Blu-ray disc if I decide that as my final output. The size also allows zooming and panning in ProShow without quality loss.

I used a YONGNUO timer that I purchased from eBay. The timer was a quarter of the price of the Canon version and the quality and build were excellent.

Set the timer to take a photograph every three seconds. On a side note, I actually had to have my assistant go up and turn off the camera after the bride made her way to the altar. I noticed a number of the guests looking back to see who the idiot was taking pictures during the quiet moments! The 30D shutter noise echoes off the ceiling of the church so I would advise only shooting the entering and leaving when there is a lot more ambient noise.

Once I returned to my office I loaded the images into Lightroom where I made color and contrast adjustments to one image and applied those adjustments to all of the images using the sync images function in Lightroom. I then exported my images to Producer using the ProShow plug-in for Lightroom. (Make sure to use the fill screen setting) Each slide was allocated a ‘0’ slide time and the transition was changed to cross fade and allocated a .05 setting. This can be adjusted to your taste. The shorter the time the faster it will appear.

Once that step was completed I output the slideshow as a HD video within Producer.

The video that was created in Producer was then placed back into a new slideshow along with the stills. This is where I panned the video left to right so that it appears I had the camera on a timed slider.

By experimenting and using these settings as a starting point just think of the cool things you can do with a spare camera, a cheap timer and ProShow Producer. Get busy!”

-Mark Ridout
Learn more about Mark, see more of his photography and slideshows over on his blog ridoutphoto.com